Employers holding back on gender pay reporting

man-and-woman-sat-on-money-piles-gender-pay-gap

Employers are holding back on gender pay reporting, according to new research.

A study, conducted by XpertHR, suggests that employers are set to leave publication of their gender pay gap reports until the very last minute rather than stand out by publishing data ahead of their competitors.

The survey of 128 companies within the private sector reveals that despite the low reporting rate to date, 26.5 per cent mid-sized companies and 51.5 per cent of larger companies have already calculated their pay gaps but haven’t yet making them public.

The survey found that 28.1 per cent of mid-sized companies and 20.6 per cent of larger companies had not yet carried out any calculations. Just 3.1 per cent and 1.5 per cent respectively had already reported. Almost all the rest had calculated their pay gaps either informally or formally but had not yet reported.

The survey also showed that seven out of ten said their pay gap was in line with expectations, with most saying that they had calculated the figures before.

Employers reported a similar lack of surprise at the extent of their gender bonus gaps – which are typically far wider than pay gaps.

Speaking about the research, XpertHR content director Mark Crail said, “Six months in, not only have tiny numbers of employers reported their gender pay gaps so far, but those that have done so have had pay gaps that were narrower than the national average.”

“It now appears that many organisations, especially those with substantial pay gaps, are holding back from publishing their reports rather than wanting to draw attention to themselves by going early.”

“Having looked at the reports that have been published so far, it is obvious that some, despite the best efforts of those concerned, do not entirely comply with the legislation.”

“Rather than leaving it until the last minute, employers should now be ensuring that their data is accurate, the calculations are in line with the legislation and that all the reporting requirements can be met.”

“Our data suggests that there will be a late surge of published data towards next April as the deadline approaches. HR departments should use the next few months wisely to really understand their own organisation’s gender pay gap and to develop a clear message to employees and the outside world about why it exists and what they are going to do about it.”

Alison Simpson
About the author

Alison is the Digital Content Editor for WeAreTheCity. She has a BA Honours degree in Journalism and History from the University of Portsmouth. She has previously worked in the marketing sector and in a copywriting role. Alison’s other passions and hobbies include writing, blogging and travelling.

Related Posts

WeAreTheCity staff are all working remotely as per the UK government's advisory. We are always looking at ways we can support women in business remotely and have launched a series of FREE virtual events (WeAreVirtual) to help support everyone in their careers and their well being. This could not be possible without the support of our network and we are very thankful for the time given by all of our speakers at these sessions.

WeAreVirtual
X