Getting a new role – three things most people don’t consider

Openly greeting a job recruiter with a firm handshake, recruitment industry, new role

Wanting or needing to look for a new role can feel like an uphill struggle, especially if you haven’t done it for a while and particularly if it’s an unexpected or unwanted situation.

There are the obvious things to do – work on your CV and LinkedIn profile, think about how you will answer questions at interview etc. However, there are three areas that often get sidelined – which is dangerous because they all contribute a great deal to a successful job search.

Job search strategy.

This is all about doing some upfront thinking before you go to the market to look for a new role. It’s important as it helps you to focus on what you are really looking for and means you’ll only spend time on relevant options.

There are two elements to creating a successful job search strategy:

  1. Your requirements – as well as what you want to be doing in the role e.g. line management, focusing on a certain technical area, you must also consider the practical elements e.g. location and amount of travel you are prepared to do. It’s not to say you will never compromise on these elements but it helps to set some criteria.
  2. Approach to market – how are you going to approach the job searching market e.g. recruiters, job boards, your network etc. You need a strategy and a plan to help you move forward in the right way.

Personal impact.

If you’re considering your Personal Impact the night before an interview when deciding what to wear, you’re thinking about your personal impact too late and in too narrow a way.

Controlling your Personal Impact begins before you start your job search. For example:

  • What can people see of you online, even beyond LinkedIn? Does this help with the perception you want potential employers to have? Having no online presence or a weak one is as telling as over-sharing is.
  • How do current colleagues, clients and your wider network view you and if asked, informally, if you’re suitable for a role you want, what would they say?
  • What impact are you having beyond your appearance during the interview? How do you come across in the way you speak, sit, and listen? Are you building rapport effectively with the interviewer? It is not just what you say but how.

Your network.

Currently, this is more valuable than ever. A majority of the job market was hidden pre Covid and this will only have increased. Companies are reducing the amount they use recruiters. Who you know is really key to your job search.

Consider your contacts and who could be useful for a conversation. Position this as an exploratory chat as you consider your career options. You don’t want someone to feel like you are expecting them to have a role for you. Having a few strategic conversations very often opens unexpected doors.

If you’re looking for a new role, or know someone who is, then do head to my website, ‘Resources’ section. There’s lots more free guidance such as this 14 minute webinar Get That Job which is packed full of tips.

If you’d prefer a more intensive and personalised approach to getting a new role, then contact me for a conversation.

Joanna GaudoinAbout the author

Joanna Gaudoin, Inside Out Image specialises in helping ambitious professionals and their organisations improve performance and achieve their goals.

She does this by helping them master and strategically use the business skills of Personal Impact and Relationship Management. These skills are required for professional success.

Before establishing Inside Out Image, Joanna worked in marketing and consultancy in large corporates. She understands the business world and its challenges. She now helps organisations and individuals understand how to succeed in it.


If you are a job seeker or someone looking to boost their career, then WeAreTheCity has thousands of free career-related articles. From interview tips, CV advice to training and working from home, you can find all our career advice articles here.

Related Posts

Comment on this

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

X